What Vaccinations Should My Kitten Get?

What vaccinations should my kitten get? If you just brought your kitten home, you will probably wonder about this. Your new kitten needs all you can provide to ensure it grows healthy, strong, and happy. This includes getting the best nutrition possible, regular grooming, good shelter, and VACCINATION.

We’ll examine vaccinations in this article, why your kitten needs them and which vaccines are needed to prevent your kitten from falling sick and also prevent the spread of disease to other pets and humans.

Why Should I Vaccinate My Kitten?

At birth, your kitten’s immune system alone can do only do so much to protect it from diseases. Before birth, the mother’s own immune system had protected it. After birth, it continues to get some level of protection from its mother thanks to the antibody-rich milk known as colostrum.

The colostrum, the anti-body rich milk provides kittens with temporary immunity against diseases, even though the length of protection can vary from kitten to kitten.

However, on average, the protection provided by the colostrum fades as the kitten grows older, usually between eight and eighteen weeks.

At this point, your kitten may become vulnerable to diseases with the colostrum doing little as a defense. To protect your kitten from certain diseases, vaccinations become needful at this stage.

How Does a Vaccine Work? 

Generally, vaccines work by triggering an immune response to a particular disease in order to prevent future infection from that same disease if your kitten ever gets exposed to it.

Felines need specific important vaccines to provide them with immunity against harmful and easily spread diseases and infections. While there are general mandatory vaccines, also known as core vaccines, your kitten may require specific vaccines (non-core) that are considered vital in your geographical location.

Also, some non-core vaccines may be required depending on the kitten’s environment and its risk of getting exposed to certain diseases.

Usually, vaccines begin at about six weeks of age and repeated every three weeks till they’re about 16 – 18 weeks old. While most vaccines will be given separately, some will be administered together in one injection referred to as a combination vaccine. This will be determined by the vaccination schedule drawn by your vet at your kitten’s first vet visit.

Will My Cat’s Vaccine Be Painful?

Even though your kitten may feel a sting or pinch when injected, vaccine injections aren’t usually painful. Some kittens may not react to it at all, so your kitten will probably not react to it.

It is not recommended to give vaccines if your kitten has a fever or any illness at all. Doing so may render the vaccine ineffective or worsen your cat’s health.

If your cat is fit and well before a vaccine, the vaccine’s effectiveness should take between 5 -10 days to kick in. Even before the shot, your kitten may still have some maternal antibodies for a particular disease but there’s really no way to be certain. If your kitten still has some antibodies left from the colostrum, there is nothing to worry about; the vaccine will not affect him.

That said, you can only be certain of the vaccine’s true immunity on your cat when all boosters are completed or when your cat reaches 16-18 weeks of age. As a precaution, you should avoid exposing your cat to strays or unknown animals until they have finished their vaccines.

Types of Kitten Vaccines

Below is a table of some diseases, their vaccines (categorized into core and non-core vaccinations), symptoms and causes.

VACCINATABLE DISEASES

CORE OR NON-CORE

CAUSES OF THE DISEASE

SIGNS & SYMPTOMS

Herpes

Core

Virus

•Corneal ulcers
•Eye discharge
•Squinting
•Sneezing
•Weakness
•Appetite loss
•Nasal discharge

Calicivirus

Core

Virus

•Mouth ulcers
•Appetite loss
•Weakness
•Increased salivation
•Watery, red eyes
•Sneezing
•Runny nose

Panleukopenia (a.k.a. “kitty distemper” or “feline parvo”)

Core

Virus

•Appetite loss
•Vomiting
•Diarrhea
•Fever
•Low white blood cell count
•Sudden death
•Weakness

Rabies

Core

Virus

•Change in meowing pattern
•Strange aggressive behavior
•Difficulty/inability to swallow
•Weakness
•Breathing issues
•Zoonotic (can affect humans)
•Sudden death

Non-Core

Virus

•Fever
•Appetite loss
•Weight loss
•Weakness
•Inflamed and reddened gums
•May lead to anemia, lymphoma and other immune-related disorders, increasing the risk of infections and other feline health issues.

Non-Core

Virus

•Anemia
•Weight loss
•Weakness
•Fever
•Diarrhea
•Appetite loss
•Enlarged lymph nodes
•Sneezing
•Wounds that don’t heal
•Eye and/or nose discharge
•Changes in urination

Chlamydia felis

Non-Core

Bacteria

•Eyes and/or nose discharge
•Limping
•Redness and puffiness around the eyes
•Appetite loss
•Weakness

Bordetella bronchiseptica

Non-Core

Bacteria

•Weakness and drowsiness
•Sneezing
•Difficulty in breathing
•Nasal discharge
•Fever
•Appetite loss
•Enlarged lymph nodes
•Coughing and sneezing

Beyond the First Year

After your cat completes the first series of vaccinations, you still have to keep it up to date on vaccinations even into adulthood. This helps to ensure that your feline stays fully protected from diseases, especially infectious ones.

Most vaccines will need to be boosted again after the one year mark. The frequency of the vaccination may also change based on the duration of the immunity provided by the vaccine.

A summary of some reasons you should vaccinate your cat

  • Your cat was involved in a catfight with a stray
  • You’re moving to a different region, state or country
  • You’ll be getting or have gotten another cat
  • You’ll be boarding your cat at the kennel, at the sitter’s or dropping it at a cat daycare with other cats
  • Your cat is going outdoors for the first time or is being allowed to spend more time outdoors

Vaccination Risks

Vaccination risks while relatively uncommon still exist. If your cat has a reaction to a vaccine, it will probably be mild and will go away on its own without further complications.

Some vaccine risks include swelling at the site of the injection, lethargy, mild fever, and pain. In rare cases, severe allergic reactions such as facial swelling, hives, breathing difficulty may occur and could require a visit to the nearest vet.

Also, vaccinations typically trigger an immune response, and as such, there is a slight possibility of developing an auto-immune disorder. Like other vaccination reactions, this is extremely rare. But if it happens to your feline, note that it can be severe and challenging to treat. It could also trigger a number of illnesses, including neuromuscular issues, skin problems, and blood disorders.

If you consider that the number of pets affected by vaccines are way less than the unaffected vaccinated ones, you’ll agree with pet experts and vets that the benefits are certainly greater than the risks with these vaccines.

That said, young felines need these vaccines at their vulnerable kitten stage and adults too. Though these days, more vets and pet experts are opting for protocols requiring less frequent vaccination.

Once vaccinations from these protocols are given annually, most adult vaccinations may be required only every three years.

Details the Vet May Need Before Scheduling Your Cat’s Vaccines

  • Your kitten’s age
  • Previously received vaccines, date, and vet
  • Your kitten’s FeLV (feline leukemia) and FIV (feline immunodeficiency virus) status (this can be determined with a regular feline blood test)
  • Your kitten’s first place of stay; was it a stray, did you get it from a breeder, a friend, pet store, or a neighbor?
  • If known, the number of cats in your kitten’s litter
  • Your kitten’s size and weight
  • Your kitten’s mom: was she well vaccinated?
  • Do you plan for your kitten to be an indoor cat or an outdoor cat?
  • Do you have other felines in the home and if you do, what is their vaccination status?
  • Will your kitten be traveling with you or will it be boarded when you’re away?
  • Will your kitten be included in a breeding program or kitten shows?
  • Your local pet laws and regulations

Vaccine Types: Core and Non-Core Vaccines 

Vaccines for cats and other pets are usually categorized under core and non-core vaccines. We explain both types below.

Core Vaccines

Most infectious diseases can easily infect other animals and humans when a feline is infected. The outcome of these diseases can be devastating and so it is highly essential to vaccinate felines against them, this is regardless of their history, living environment and lifestyle.

Non-Core Vaccines 

These vaccine types usually depend on conditions specific to your kitten, e.g. its living condition, exposure to other pets, living area, and lifestyle.

Your vet might recommend some or one of the non-core vaccines if some risk factors apply to your pet. While all cats may not need the vaccinations, they are essential and highly beneficial to at-risk cats.

Lay bare the details during your vet visit, and he’ll decide if any non-core vaccine is needed besides the core ones.

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